Usage and Care

It is amazing what mechanical watches are expected to do with extreme precision and often little consideration, for years on end. They really are miniature mechanical marvels. Take care of them.

Adjusting the date on your Annual Calendar Chronograph

The Day/Night display in the minute counter at 12 o’clock is a great aid in adjusting the date. It indicates whether the watch shows the day (white) or night hours (black). When the Day/Night display is indicating night hours (loosely from 6:30 pm to 6:30 am), the mechanism driving the calendar is activated.

In order to preserve the gear wheels, no fast adjustment should take place when any of the night sector is visible in the Day/Night display.

A short film on adjusting the date on the Annual Calendar can be found here.

If the date needs to be corrected by just one day

1. Gently pull the crown from its fully-in (winding) position against the case to its first outward (first click) and then second outward (second click) position.

2. Gently wind the crown anti-clockwise to advance the hands. Date changes occur when the dark “night” sector shows in the Day/Night display (at the end of a short month two date changes occur between 11 pm and 6 am). Continue to adjust the hands to the desired time, then gently push the crown back two clicks to its original winding position. Job done.

If the date needs to be corrected by more than one day

You can rapidly advance the date by using its fast correction feature:

1. Gently pull the crown from its fully-in (winding) position against the case to its first outward (first click) and then second outward (second click) position.

2. Adjust the hands clockwise to 10:30 am as indicated by the white (day) sector in the Day/Night display.

3. Push the crown inward one click and gently wind the crown clockwise to advance the date with the date adjustment mechanism. Continue to gently advance the date until the date shown is one day before the required date.

4. Gently pull the crown outward again to its second position and wind the crown anti-clockwise so the hands advance though the “night” and in doing so change the date to the date required. Note that at the end of a short month, this date change is extended and occurs in two steps between 11 pm and 6 am.

5. Continue to adjust the hands to the desired time, then gently push the crown back by two clicks to its original winding position. Job done.

When your watch is running, the time taken for the date to change will vary as there is a longer date changeover at the end of the short months. This longer change is due to our decision to use a small radius for the driving finger to minimise the force required for the month change and thus spread it over a longer time-frame. By doing it this way, the watch maintains a higher balance amplitude – and therefore better time-keeping.


Time Setting

Without a date mechanism

1. Gently pull the crown from its standard fully-in (winding) position against the case to its first outward (first click) and then second outward (second click) position.

2. In this second position, the hands are stopped to allow setting the time to the second if desired.

3. After adjusting the hands to the desired time, gently push the crown back two clicks to its original winding position. Job done.

Backward hand adjustment

It is generally advised not to wind the hands backwards other than for minor adjustments to the minutes. In the case of watches with a date display, do not adjust the hands backward at a time when the date may be changing or has just changed.

With a date mechanism

1. Gently pull the crown from its standard fully-in (winding) position against the case to its first (first click) and then second outward (second click) position.

2. In this second position the hands are stopped to allow the setting of the time to the second if needed.

3. Wind the crown anti-clockwise to advance the hands. If your watch is an Annual Calendar Chronograph and the dark (night) sector is showing in the Day/Night display, advancing the hands though to the next “day” will cause the date to also advance.

4. After adjusting the hands to the desired time, gently push the crown back two clicks to its original (winding) position. Job done.

Backward hand adjustment

For watches with a date, it is recommended that you never wind the hands backwards during the hours when the date may be changing or has just changed, i.e. when the dark night sector is visible in the Day/Night display. Doing so risks damaging the gears and drive fingers of mechanical watches.


The Chronograph

The chronograph mechanism can time events up to 12 hours in duration… and is great fun to play with.

To start the chronograph, press the pusher at 2 o'clock. This starts the central chronograph seconds hand. Every revolution of the central chronograph seconds advances the hand of the minute counter by one minute.

If you watch has an hour counter, every full revolution of the hand on the minute counter (30 minutes) will cause the hour counter hand to advance in a ½-hour increment.

To stop the chronograph, press again the pusher at 2 o'clock. The recorded time can then be read off the various scales.

To reset the chronograph, press the pusher at 4 o'clock. All the indicator hands will instantly be reset to zero.

All the chronograph sequences are, like the rest of the watch, entirely achieved by mechanical means: drive fingers, wheels, and heart cams with reset hammers. Treat them gently and they will be around for generations.

Telemeter scales

Your Annual Calendar Chronograph has a Telemeter scale allowing you to estimate the distance between yourself and an observed and heard event by simply using the difference in speeds between light and sound.

Here is a classic example: to estimate the distance to a lightening strike, start your chronograph when you see the lightening and stop it when you hear the thunder. The distance (in km and in miles) is then directly read off the scale. Another early use of this procedure was to estimate the distance to an artillery battery based on muzzle flash and report – we do not recommend this.

Water resistance

Your Kennsen watch leaves our premises tested water-resistant to 50m (165ft). The gaskets that ensure this protection can however be damaged over time or by shocks. Like all watch manufacturers, we recommend a watchmaker checks the water resistance once per year (it’s not a big job).

While we designed our watches to cope with getting wet and the occasional forgetful dip in the handbasin or swimming pool, it was not built for swimming with. We strongly advise you to refrain from using the chronograph pushers or the crown when the watch is wet as this may let water into the watch.

If the watch gets wet in the sea, give it a short rinse under warm tap water to remove the salt.

Strap

Our top quality Alligator leather straps are hand-made for us by Hirsch, Biel/Bienne, Switzerland. You can order new Kennsen Alligator straps from our website. You can of course also replace your strap by any strap with a width between lugs of 20mm.

Shocks

Your Kennsen watch meets the Swiss watchmaking norms for shock resistance. However you may have been told as a child not to drop watches – that still holds true. Try to avoid shocks and knocks that could damage your watch… or more importantly, yourself.

Finding North

OK, no way we can claim this as unique to Kennsen, but analogue watches possess another useful feature: They can be used as a rough compass to find North (that is if they are running to the correct time and outside of the tropics). Here is how to proceed:

Finding North in the Northern Hemisphere

1. Hold your watch horizontally.

2. Point the hour hand at the Sun.

3. South is pointed to by the imaginary line that is half the angle between the hour hand and the “12” hour index as measured through the central axis.

4. North is indicated by the continuation of that line in the opposite direction.

Finding North in the Southern Hemisphere

1. Hold your watch horizontally.

2. Point the “12” hour index at the Sun.

3. North is pointed to by the imaginary line that is half the angle between the “12” hour index and the hour hand as measured through the central axis.